ITEM 114-2704-R0302 (Attachment)

 

MONTANA STATE UNIVERSITY-BILLINGS

COLLEGE OF EDUCATION AND HUMAN SERVICES

DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH, PHYSICAL EDUCATION

 AND HUMAN SERVICES

 

PROPOSAL FOR A MASTERS DEGREE IN ATHLETIC TRAINING

 

OBJECTIVES AND NEEDS

 

1.       Centrality to or enhancement of the institution’s approved mission and institutional objectives to be achieved by the addition of this program

 

a.       Goals and objectives – Montana State University-Billings is a comprehensive, regional, public university serving the educational needs of Montanans and is accessible to all who are qualified.  A primary mission of the institution is to prepare students of all ages to be productive and responsible citizens.  The mission of the Department of Health, Physical Education and Human Services is to prepare highly competent professionals who are committed to leadership, lifelong learning, exceptional service, and the promotion of healthy lifestyles in diverse health, physical education, sport, and human service settings.  The addition of an Athletic Training program at Montana State University-Billings fits within the approved University and Departmental missions.

 

b.       Intellectual basis for the curriculum -  In the United States, the growth of Athletic Training has closely followed the growth of American football.  In 1869, Rutgers played Princeton in the first recorded intercollegiate football game.  By 1905, there were 18 deaths and 159 serious injuries attributed to football, which prompted President Theodore Roosevelt to seriously consider banning the sport of football.  During this early period, injuries were tended to by each team’s coach or team physician, with one exception: Harvard University.  In 1881, James Robinson was hired to work as the team’s athletic trainer (Ebel, 1999).  Following Harvard’s example, several universities began to coax other professionals into working as team athletic trainers.  Some of those who answered the call to work with these university sports teams were former boxing trainers who began to make their way from the boxing gyms into early athletic training rooms.  In 1950, the first National Athletic Training Clinic, sponsored by the Cramer Chemical Company, was held in Kansas City with roughly 100 attendees (American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons, 1991).  This clinic was the foundation for what has become the National Athletic Trainers’ Association (NATA).  From this small beginning, the association slowly grew.  As the association grew, it became apparent the profession needed to standardize what type of entry-level education young athletic trainers were receiving before entering the profession.  In 1970, the NATA formed the Professional Education Committee, which was charged with evaluating collegiate athletic training programs seeking approval from the NATA.  By 1973, there were 14 schools with NATA-approved undergraduate curricula.  Later the Professional Education Committee would become what is known today as the Joint Review Committee on Athletic Training (JRC-AT) (Ebel, 1999).  The National Athletic Trainers’ Association Board of Certification (NATABOC) was formed in 1970.  The NATABOC was formed to oversee the development of the athletic training entrance examination.  The first exam was given in 1971 and is currently the tool used for certifying athletic trainers today.

 

c.       Proposed Course of Study

 

Courses

Cr.

EDF 501 Research Design and Interpretation

3

STAT 541 Applied Statistics

3

*HPE 562 Graduate Athletic Training I

3

*HPE 563 Graduate Athletic Training II

3

*HPE 565 Lower Extremity Evaluation

5

*HPE 566 Upper Extremity Evaluation

5

HPE 590 Internship/Practicum

3

HPE 463 Kinesiology and Biomechanics

3

HPE 410 Psychology of Coaching

3

HPE 465 Legal Aspects of Sport

3

HPE 450 Sci. Fundamentals of Human Movement

3

HPE 599 Thesis/Research Project

3

Total

40

 

*New Courses

 

d.       Possible Course Rotations

 

First Year

Fall

 

Spring

 

EDF 501 -Research Design and Interpretation

3

HPE 463 – Kinesiology and Biomechanics

3

Stat 541 – Applied Statistics

3

HPE 410 – Psychology of Coaching

3

HPE 562 - Graduate Athletic Training I

3

HPE 563 – Graduate Athletic Training II

3

Total Credits

9

Total Credits

9

 


Second Year

Fall

 

Spring

 

HPE 465 – Legal Aspects of Sport

3

HPE 590 - Internship/Practicum

3

HPE 565 – Lower Extremity Evaluation

5

HPE 566 - Upper Extremity Evaluation

5

HPE 450 - Sci. Fund. Of Human Movement

3

HPE 599 - Thesis/ Research Project

3

Total Credits

11

Total Credits

11

 

e.       Course Descriptions

 

                     i.      EDF 501-Research Design and Interpretation.  3 cr.  Extends students’ undergraduate preparation via a survey of the broad natural history through experimental strategies to philosophy of science.  Engages students in what was historically known as natural philosophy.  The concepts, skills, insight, and understanding needed to appropriately apply and interpret this wide range of research are presented, with students engaging in individual projects that lead them through every phase of integrated, though introductory, research.  The course provides the basis for further master’s level research (MSU-B, 2000).

 

                   ii.      *HPE 450 – Scientific Fundamentals of Human Movement.  3 cr.  Prerequisite:  HPE 260.  Extends the introduction of exercise science from HPE 260 (Foundations of Health Enhancement) in examining the physiological and psychomotor functioning of the human body in response to muscular activity.  Focuses on the effect of exercise on various body systems (i.e., respiratory, circulatory, muscular, and endocrine) and on the learning and control of the motor skills.  Special emphasis is given to the physiological and psychomotor aspects of physical fitness, sports skills, and exercise.  Includes weekly lab activities (MSU-B, 1999).

 

                  iii.      *HPE 463 – Kinesiology and Biomechanics.  3 cr.  Prerequisite: HPE 350.  Examines the anatomy and mechanics of human motion with the goal of improving efficiency in sport, dance, and exercise (MSU-B, 1999).

 

                  iv.      HPE 410 – Psychology of Coaching.  3 cr.  Prerequisite: Junior standing.  Covers the psychological aspects of coaching that are essential in all coaching, not specific to one sport.  Examines both the intra- and interpersonal aspects of sport achievement from an applied perspective, emphasizing effective leadership of athletics.  Connects study of the topical areas of sport psychology to coaching (MSU-B, 1999).

 

                    v.      HPE 465 – Legal Aspects of Sport.  3 cr.  Prerequisite: HPE 410 or permission of instructor.  Analysis of the legal aspect of sport, athletics, and other physical activity in contemporary society.  Includes use of the case study method.  Particular emphasis is given to tort liability and risk management in coaching (MSU-B, 1999).

 

                  vi.      HPE 562 – Graduate Athletic Training I.  3 cr.  Prerequisite: Admission to the graduate athletic training program.  This course will offer an introduction to the field of athletic training including the history of the profession, care and prevention of athletic injuries, nutrition, psychology, and anatomy and physiology.

 

                 vii.      HPE 563 – Graduate Athletic Training II. 3 cr.  Prerequisite: Admission to the graduate athletic training program.  This course will focus on the organization and administration of athletic training programs.  The instructor and guest lecturers will also discuss current topics in sports medicine.

 

               viii.      HPE 565 – Lower Extremity Evaluation.  5 cr.  Prerequisite: Admission to the graduate athletic training program.  This course will offer an intensive study of anatomy and physiology, goniometry, therapeutic modalities, and therapeutic exercise geared towards preparing the athletic training student for the NATABOC exam.  This course will cover the lower extremities, hips, pelvis and lower back.

 

                 ix.      HPE 566 – Upper extremity evaluation.  5 cr.  Prerequisite: Admission to the graduate athletic training program. This course will offer an intensive study of anatomy and physiology, goniometry, therapeutic modalities, and therapeutic exercise geared towards preparing the athletic training student for the NATABOC exam.  This course will cover the head, neck, upper extremities, chest and abdomen.

 

                   x.      HPE 590 – Internship/practicum.  3 cr.  Provides experience in a responsible appointment as an assistant in physical education and/or health settings (MSU-B, 2000)

 

                 xi.      HPE 599 – Thesis/Research Project.  3 cr.

 

                xii.      Stat 541 – Applied Statistics.  Provides the basic methodology for estimation, hypothesis testing, and model fitting in a variety of settings.  Demonstrates fundamental concepts of statistical reasoning and research design.  Includes analytical techniques for classification models, correlational studies and prediction (MSU-B, 2000).

 

* Will require a change in the course rubric.

 

f.         Prospective instructional methods or delivery by telecommunications – The instructional methods to be employed during the program will include classroom- based instruction coupled with appropriate clinical experiences.  The program director in conjunction with other program staff will explore the feasibility of offering elements of the program at a distance in the future.

 

2.       Need for the Program - Within the field of athletic training there are two bodies which offer accreditation to university programs.  The NATA offers accreditation to those programs that are designed for students who have already obtained NATABOC certification and wish to further their education by earning a master’s degree in the field of athletic training.  The Commission on Accreditation of Allied Health Programs (CAAHEP) is the organization that offers accreditation to universities offering entry-level programs designed to prepare students to sit for the NATABOC certification exam.  CAAHEP accreditation is available for both undergraduate and graduate degree programs.  There are currently fourteen graduate athletic training programs in the United States.  Thirteen of these programs are NATA accredited and require a student be certified by the NATABOC prior to enrollment.  One program, at the University of Nebraska-Omaha, is currently the only CAAHEP-accredited entry-level graduate program.  This program allows students in related disciplines (exercise physiology, physical therapy, biology, etc…) the opportunity to pursue an athletic training certification without having to earn a second bachelor’s degree.  In each of the fourteen programs, students must have several specialized courses completed prior to applying for admittance into the athletic training program.  All fourteen of the programs are two years in length.  Currently there are two ways that a student can become eligible to sit for the NATABOC exam.  First is through a curriculum-based program where students study the field of athletic training within a structured education program certified by the CAAHEP.  Within the structure of a certified program, students undertake a minimum of two years of coursework and clinical experience.  Curriculum students concentrate on a variety of subjects relating to athletics and spend a minimum of 800 hours under the direct supervision of a certified athletic trainer.  The second way a student may become eligible to sit for the NATABOC exam is through the internship route.  Through the internship route, a student becomes eligible to sit for the exam by taking college courses in the areas of: health, human anatomy, kinesiology/biomechanics, human physiology, physiology of exercise, basic athletic training, and advanced athletic training (NATABOC, 2001).  The student also must spend a minimum of 1500 hours under the direct supervision of a certified athletic trainer.  The NATABOC requires direct supervision of student athletic trainers so that the supervising ATC may intervene on a patient’s behalf.  As of January 1, 2004, the NATA will eliminate the internship route to certification.  The NATA has voted to eliminate the internship route to certification in an effort to standardize the education of athletic trainers who are entering the profession.  The main reason for standardizing the education of athletic trainers is to assure all students meet standards required for athletic trainers to be eligible for state licensure.  It is fortunate for the athletic training profession that athletic trainers have filled an important niche in collegiate athletics.  They are acting both as healthcare providers to athletes and as liaisons between athletic departments and the medical community.  Through the years athletic trainers have proven themselves to be cost-effective caregivers within the structure of the athletic department.  The decision by the NATA to abandon the internship route to certification has become a source of major concern to many athletic departments that have come to rely heavily on student athletic trainers to supplement their work force within the department.  Student athletic trainers often work as advanced first-aid providers in the absence of a certified athletic trainer at practices and games.  Also, student athletic trainers are often utilized to help with game-day preparations, such as setting up the court or field.  This lack of a potential workforce is such a concern that the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) launched an investigation into the potential effects of the loss of the internship route on its members (NCAA, 2000).  Another effect of the loss of the internship route to certification is an influx of students looking for entry-level athletic training programs at the graduate level.  Students who fall short of the January 1, 2004, deadline will most likely finish with degrees in related fields at their respective colleges.  This will leave the students with two options if they still wish to pursue athletic training.  First, enroll in a school with an accredited undergraduate program and earn a second bachelor’s degree.  Secondly, enroll in an entry-level graduate program.  Presently there is only one such program in the United States, and it only accepts twenty students per year.  Also, right now professionals in related fields (exercise physiologists, physical therapists, etc.) who wish to become athletic trainers will face the same choice: either earn a second bachelor’s degree or enroll in an entry-level graduate program. 

 

3.       New courses the program will add to the curriculum and course requirements for the degree – The following are new courses that will be added:

 

*HPE 562 Graduate Athletic Training I

3

*HPE 563 Graduate Athletic Training II

3

*HPE 565 Lower Extremity Evaluation

5

*HPE 566 Upper Extremity Evaluation

5

 

For additional information regarding course requirements of the program, please see 1.c., 1.d., and 1.e. above.

 

 

1.       Adequacy of present faculty, facilities, equipment, and library holdings in support of the program, compared to known or anticipated minimum standards for accreditation.

 

a.       Faculty/staff - there are several staffing requirements that a program must meet in order to be accredited by CAAHEP.  First, are the requirements for the program director.  The program director must be a full-time teaching faculty member of the institution.  The program director must also be a NATABOC-certified athletic trainer with three years of experience as an ATC and in supervising student athletic trainers.  A second set of program requirements relates to faculty.  The only requirement listed for faculty is that they must be qualified to teach in their respective Athletic Training Educational Competencies into their course work.  Third, are the guidelines for the approved clinical instructor (ACI).  The ACI is a certified athletic trainer who has completed the clinical instructor-training course required by the JRC-AT.  Fourth, are the guidelines for clinical instructors.  Clinical instructors are professionals in their area of expertise, such as physical therapists, nutritionists and physicians.  They must provide direct supervision of students and would intervene on behalf of a person being treated by a student, should the need arise.  Faculty members must also incorporate the NATA. The final member of the program is the medical director or team physician.  The medical director helps provide guidance to assure all medical-related areas within the curriculum meet acceptable standards.

 

b.       Facility – The guidelines for a CAAHEP accredited program lists specific items necessary for physical resources such as: adequate facilities, therapeutic modalities, athletic training-related first aid and medical care supplies and equipment (JRC-AT, 1991).  Currently the athletic training facility is adequate for the existing staff and teams.  However, with the addition of 40 athletic training students and additional intercollegiate athletic teams, the facilities are inadequate.  The Department of Health, Physical Education and Human Services has worked closely over the years with the Department of Athletics to identify additional space for a human performance lab and athletic training room.  While space for such a facility has been identified within the PE Building, some additional costs are associated with retrofitting the area for athletic training activities.

 

c.       Equipment – Like the facility, equipment needs increase as students increase.  Equipment needs for the program have been determined by reviewing accreditation standards and the training facilities of accredited programs.  Specific details regarding additional equipment needs is included below.

 

d.       Library – An extensive assessment of existing library holdings related to athletic training has been conducted.  Additional library materials have also been identified and will be obtained, as resources are available.  See: http://www.msubillings.edu/library/guides/athletictraining.htm

 

2.       If special accreditation will be sought, timetable and costs associated with attaining and sustaining full accreditation status as well as the level needed for each to fulfill anticipated minimum standards for accreditation (whether or not it would be sought). - The Commission on Accreditation of Allied Health Education Programs (CAAHEP) will accredit the Montana State University-Billings masters degree program.   CAAHEP accredits programs for the Athletic Trainer upon the recommendation of the Joint Review Committee on Educational Programs in Athletic Training (JRC-AT).  Montana State University – Billings will apply for candidacy during the 2003-2004 academic year and anticipate a site visit from JRC-AT during the 2004-2005 academic year.  In order to be accredited by CAAHEP, an athletic training program must be up and running and fully functional.  At the beginning of the first academic year, the program must apply to the JRC-AT for candidacy status.  The $500 candidacy fee must accompany the request, and the program can begin the process of a self-study.  Between June 1 and September 1 of the following year, the program director must submit four copies of the self-study, together with a $500 application fee that begins the application for accreditation.  During the final semester of the two-year program, the program director must schedule an on-site visit from JRC-AT representatives.  During this visit officials from the JRC-AT will interview faculty, staff and students involved in the program, as well as review all course syllabi and related materials.  Based on this on-site visit and a review of all submitted materials, the JRC-AT will make their recommendation to CAAHEP as to whether accreditation should be granted. Once the program has been reviewed by JRC-AT and approved by CAAHEP, CAAHEP will assess an annual institutional fee of $300.00.  CAAHEP assesses one flat fee for all programs accredited by CAAHEP.

 

3.       Assessment plan: how the program will “fit” within the institution’s internal, approved assessment process and specifically address the major assessment components of academic performance and program relevancy to student-society needs complementing the guidelines provided to campuses by the OCHE and the Intra-campus Committee on Outcomes Assessment (ICOA), which address the following factors: (a) entry level preparedness and predicted success of students-collection of baseline data, (b) intermediate assessment of student performance by quantitative and qualitative measures, (c) end-of-instruction assessment, (d) student/alumni satisfaction, (e) employer satisfaction and (f) program review.

 

a.       Consistent with CAAHEP accreditation standards, the program director will work closely with the faculty, clinical faculty, medical director, students as well as other constituents to design an assessment system to collect, analyze, and summarize data. Sources of data will include, but not be limited to, surveys of graduating students, graduates, and employers related to curriculum satisfaction, employment settings, type and scope of practice, job performance, and post-graduate knowledge and skill.  The program shall document instructional effectiveness.  For instructional staff, sources of data will include, but are not limited to such assessment measures as course/instructor evaluations, clinical instructor evaluations, medical and allied health personnel evaluations.  The program director will work to insure that the program prepares students to achieve approved competencies as outlines by the accrediting body.  Each course taught through the program will have identifiable competencies and outcomes associated with it and mechanisms in place to assess achievement of those competencies and outcomes.

 

 

1.       Additional faculty requirements, including qualifications, salary, and recruitment.

 

a.       Names and Qualifications – Personnel  associated with the athletic training program at Montana State University –Billings will include a program director, faculty, clinical instructor, and the medical director.  To satisfy CAAHEP accreditation standards, the program director must be a full-time teaching faculty member of Montana State University - Billings.  The program director must also be an NATABOC-certified athletic trainer with three years of experience as an ATC and in supervising student athletic trainers.  Additional program faculty must be qualified to teach in their respective areas of expertise.  Faculty members must also incorporate the NATA Athletic Training Educational Competencies into their course work.  Approved Clinical Instructors (ACI) is a certified athletic trainer who has completed the clinical instructor-training course required by the JRC-AT.  Clinical instructors are professionals in their area of expertise, such as physical therapists, nutritionists and physicians.  They must provide direct supervision of students and would intervene on behalf of a person being treated by a student, should the need arise.  Because of the direct supervision requirement, it is recommended that the student-to-clinical instructor ratio never exceed 8-to-1.  The final member of the program is the medical director or team physician (MD or DO).  The medical director helps provide guidance to assure all medical-related areas within the curriculum meets acceptable standards.

 

b.       Necessary Recruitment – The program at Montana State University-Billings seeks to employ the services of a program director that has experience in athletic training and has a terminal degree.  While the market for qualified applicant is limited, the Department of Health, Physical Education and Human Services will take every possible measure to attract a qualified applicant including but not limited to advertising in athletic training specific venues.  To meet accreditation standards and better service the anticipated student needs a clinical faculty member will also be hired.  Costs associated with these two important positions are outlined below.

 

 2.  Impact on Facilities

 

a.       Library – Details regarding the library needs are included above. 

 

b.       Athletic Training Room – As detailed above, the current athletic training facilities are not adequate to service the additional students projected through this program.  As a result, the athletic training room will be expanded to allow for more students to be involved with athletic teams.  The old weight room on campus is currently a storage area.  This area will be cleaned out and renovated to service the new program.  It is anticipated that the renovations will cost under $10,000.

 

c.       Equipment – The athletic training room currently has enough equipment to meet the demands of the training.  However, additional equipment will be needed in order to accommodate the additional students.  This equipment is outline in #3 below.

 

3.      Costs – The tables below outline the various expenses and revenues of the program as 20 new students are admitted to the program every year.

 

EXPENSES WORKSHEET

 YEAR 1

 YEAR 2

 YEAR 3

 YEAR 4

 YEAR 5

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total new student FTE (each year)

0.00

20.00

20.00

20.00

20.00

Total Student Enrollment

0.00

20.00

40.00

40.00

40.00

 

 

 

 

 

 

Anticipated New Expenditures

 

 

 

 

 

Cost of faculty fte to support new courses

 $58,773.00

 $58,773.00

 $  58,773.00

 $  58,773.00

 $  58,773.00

One time startup cost per faculty FTE

 $  1,500.00

 

 

 

 

Ongoing department operating costs per new faculty ($1000/FTE)

 $  1,000.00

 $  1,000.00

 $    1,000.00

 $    1,000.00

 $    1,000.00

Graduate Assistant Athletic Trainer (Resident)

 $           -  

 $ 4,400 .00

 $    4,400.00

$    4,400.00

$    4,400.00

Specialized program accreditation costs

 

 

 

 

 

CAAHEP Accreditation Fee

 

 

 

 $      300.00

 $       300.00

JRC-AT Candidacy Fee

 $           -  

 $    500.00

 $      500.00

 

 

JRC-AT Accreditation Fee

 

 

 

 $      600.00

 $       600.00

JRC-AT Site visit

 

 

 $   2,500.00

 

 

Initial marketing costs (estimate $1000 first year)

 $  1,000.00

 

 

 

 

Ongoing marketing costs

 $            -  

 $  1,000.00

 $    1,000.00

 $    1,000.00

 $    1,000.00

Needed increase in library holdings, including ongoing costs

 $  1,000.00

 $  1,000.00

 $    1,000.00

 $    1,000.00

 $    1,000.00

Faculty professional development costs

 $  1,000.00

 $  1,000.00

 $    1,000.00

 $    1,000.00

 $    1,000.00

Equipment

 

 

 

 

 

Bailey compact taping table

 $     265.00

 

 

 

 

Combo athletic tape (1 case per new student @ $33.00)

 $            -  

 $   660.00

 $      660.00

 $      660.00

 $      660.00

IBM compatible computer (1 total)

 $  1,000.00

 

 

 

 

X-ray Illuminator

 $     135.00

 

 

 

 

Spine board and accessories

 $     200.00

 

 

 

 

Student Trainer Workstation (3 total)

 $  1,000.00

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Program Expenses

$66,873.00

 $68,333.00

 $70,833.00

 $68,733.00

 $68,733.00

 

REVENUE WORKSHEET

 YEAR 1

 YEAR 2

 YEAR 3

 YEAR 4

 YEAR 5

Source of Funds 

 

 

 

 

 

Appropriated Funds – reallocation

$66,873.00

$73,680.00

$73,680.00

$74,080.00

$74,080.00

 

 

 

 

 

 

Nature of Funds

 

 

 

 

 

Recurring

$66,873.00

$73,680.00

$73,680.00

$74,080.00

$74,080.00

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Program Revenues

$66,873.00

$73,680.00

$73,680.00

$74,080.00

$74,080.00

4.   Impact on Enrollment, numbers of students (both graduate and undergraduate) with lower and upper division course breakdowns and the number expected to graduate over a ten-year period.

 

b.       Planned Student/Faculty Ratio – Again, because of the direct supervision requirement imposed by CAAHEP, it is recommended that the student-to-clinical instructor ratio never exceed 8-to-1 during clinical sessions.  For regular classroom instruction, it is anticipated that student/faculty ratio will be 20-to-1.

 

c.       Student Employment Opportunities - The April 2001 issue of the NATA News contained a report on the graduation statistics from the approved graduate athletic training programs.  There were 142 graduates from the thirteen programs in the year 2000.  Of the 142, 75 (53%) were male, 67 (47%) were female, and 116 (83%) stayed in the field of athletic training after graduation.  Ten (7%) went on to pursue post-graduate degrees, with four (3%) pursuing post-graduate work in athletic training.  At the time of the survey only one (1%) of the athletic training graduates reported being unemployed.  The overall unemployment rate for all athletic training students from 1996-2000 was 3%, only 20 of 694 students.  The February 2001 issue of the NATA News contained an article that listed salary data for all athletic trainers in the year 2000.  The salary range for an athletic trainer with a master’s degree is quite varied, ranging from less than $25,000 annually to over $60,000.  The national average salary for an athletic trainer with a master’s degree is $47,028.

 

d.       Projected Size of Program – Costs for the program have been based on the addition of 20 new students a year.  Total number of student to be served on a yearly basis, excluding year 1, is 40.  For additional information regarding student numbers by year, please see the expenses and revenue worksheet above.

 

5.       Relationship to other programs on campus, including the inter-departmental implications of this programs addition to the curriculum, and/or to the role other departments play in contributing courses to this program - With regard to course work, students will fulfill the requirements of the program by taking courses only within the Department of Health, Physical Education and Human Services with the exception of the standard research and statistics courses required in all masters programs.

 

6.       Relationship to Other Institutions – The athletic training program at Montana State University-Billings will be the first of its kind in the State of Montana.  Currently University of Montana has an entry-level undergraduate program athletic training program but no entry-level programs exist at the graduate level.  In fact, as indicated above, only one such program currently exists in the country.   Due to changes in the certification requirements, there will be more of a demand for entry-level graduate programs in athletic training.

 

 

NOTE:  Special thanks to Todd Hull, ATC for his assistance in the preparation of this proposal.  Mr. Hull’s thesis research contributed in part to the information provided above.