ITEM 112-1501-R0901    ATTACHMENT                                                  September 27-28, 2001

 

PROGRAM DESCRIPTION

 

1.          Briefly describe the proposed new program.  Please indicate if it is an expansion of an existing program; a new program; a cooperative effort with another institution, business, or industry; and an on-campus or off-campus program.  Attach any formal agreements established for cooperative efforts.

 

Montana Tech is submitting a proposal to offer a new and innovative, multi-entry/exit degree program in Health Care Informatics at both the Associate of Applied Science (AAS) and the Bachelor of Science (BS) levels.  This technology-based, innovative, 2+2 degree expands upon and complements the college’s existing offerings in Nursing, Computer Science, and Professional and Technical Communication.  These programs will be offered at Montana Tech and its College of Technology.  “Health Care Informatics” is an emerging specialization in the health care industry that joins the disciplines of information technology, communications, and health care (see figure below).  Although programs in Nursing, Biomedical, and Medical Informatics currently exist at the Masters level, Montana Tech’s programs in Health Care Informatics will be the first known programs in the United States at the undergraduate level.  No informatics programs are available in Montana.  A related program in Health Information Technology is available at the MSU-Great Falls College of Technology.  This program is available on-line and some courses could be transferable into the AAS in Health Care Informatics.

 

Montana Tech proposes this new degree program in cooperation with St. James Healthcare and its family of nine hospitals that comprise the Sisters of Charity of Leavenworth Health System, headquartered in Leavenworth, KS.  Three of the nine facilities are located in Montana and include St. James Healthcare in Butte, St. Vincent Healthcare in Billings, and Holy Rosary Healthcare in Miles City.  In the Fall of 2000, St. James Healthcare requested that Montana Tech respond to a serious technology gap that exists in the healthcare industry.  The health care industry in America increasingly needs professionals who have a unique combination of both clinical and computer science skills.  According to a comprehensive study conducted by the US Department of Commerce, the health care industry worldwide has become increasingly reliant upon technology and information management.  This has resulted in a significant technology transfer gap between those professionals entrusted to provide clinical care and those who manage the complex information systems required to operate today’s health care system.  This gap threatens the effective and efficient management of health care information surrounding the patient.  This multi-entry/exit degree will result in skilled and trained professionals who can facilitate the transfer and interpretation of patient information to enhance health care.  AAS graduates will enter the workforce as Health Care Informatics Technicians while BS graduates will enter as Health Care Informaticists.  All relevant coursework from the AAS program will articulate into the BS program (refer to page 5 for a complete description of the curriculum).  A BS in Health Care Informatics was chosen over a BAS in Health Care Informatics because of the multi-entry/multi-exit aspects of the program as well as transfer credit issues.  Block transfers of credits will not be offered for this degree as is the case with most BAS degrees; all student credits will be evaluated on a course-by-course basis.  Students will be required to seek admission into the upper division upon completion of the AAS program.  The need for these professionals has been well recognized and documented across the state and nation.  Montana Tech expects to attract nationally competitive undergraduate students into this program.  The level of interest in this program has been very high.

 

Further, a joint proposal has been prepared by St. James Healthcare and Montana Tech and is currently before the US Senate Appropriations Committee to provide capital and operating resources needed to build the National Center for Health Care Informatics (NCHCI) to be located on the campus of St. James Healthcare.  This 8,000 ft2 facility will house instructional and laboratory facilities for students enrolled in Montana Tech’s Health Care Informatics degree programs.  The NCHCI will seek the support of corporate sponsors to help equip laboratories with necessary hardware and software.  The NCHCI will be directly integrated into the clinical setting at St. James Healthcare.  The NCHCI presents substantial opportunities for economic development activities in Southwest Montana and will highlight the importance and impact of corporate/university partnerships in building the economy of Montana. (See Attachment A for a complete description of the proposed National Center for Health Care Informatics). 

 

Although the NCHCI would enhance the degree programs in Health Care Informatics, the success of these programs is not dependent upon the presence of this facility.  Additionally, the Sisters of Charity of Leavenworth Health System is prepared to provide substantial scholarship support for this program as well as internship locations for students enrolled in the Health Care Informatics degrees.  St. James Healthcare will provide resources to support a national advertising campaign to attract “healthcare professionals in transition” into this program.  These students will enter the program midstream having already attained an AS or BS degree.  While enrolled in this program, St. James will provide these students with scholarships and housing stipends as well as temporary employment through the hospital’s per diem pool (on call pool).  This addition of skilled healthcare professionals will be of substantial benefit to St. James Healthcare.  Attachment B is a letter from St. James Healthcare stating their desire to enter into partnership with Montana Tech to help develop the degrees in Health Care Informatics.

 

2.          Summarize a needs assessment conducted to justify the proposal.  Please include how the assessment plan was developed or executed and the data derived from this effort.

 

Montana Tech and St. James Healthcare recently completed a national survey of  Hospitals, long-term care facilities, Health Management Organizations (HMO’s), Hospital Networks, and Blue Cross/Blue Shield providers.  The survey was drawn randomly from a list of over 10,500 healthcare facilities and was intended to gather information from various health care providers regarding their opinions of the proposed degree, the necessary skills of health care informatics professionals, and the marketability of prospective graduates at both the AAS and BS levels.  A copy of the survey and the full findings of the survey have been provided in Attachment C.  Although the sample size is small compared to the entire population, the results clearly demonstrate the need to develop the proposed degree program in Health Care Informatics and the demand for graduates of these programs at both the AAS and BS levels.

 

The first section of the survey attempted to assess whether the survey respondents had adequate staffing and available candidates to fill information systems positions within their healthcare facilities.  Of the survey respondents, 61% felt that they did not have adequate staffing and 51% felt that there is an insufficient number of trained professionals to work in information systems positions in their healthcare setting. 

 

The second section of the survey was specific to professionals with Health Care Informatics backgrounds.  Survey respondents were provided with a detailed explanation of the skills of the AAS Informatics Technicians and the BS Informaticists and asked to reference these skills in responding to the questions.  On a scale of 1 to 5 with 1 being “not needed” and 5 being “very important,” survey respondents ranked the importance of employees with a health care informatics background at 3.7.  When asked if they would hire someone with a health care informatics background, 76.5% said they would hire someone with a BS degree and 84.3% said they would hire someone with an AAS degree.  The respondents on average indicated that they would hire 1.41 professionals per year with a bachelor’s degree and 1.24 professionals per year with an associate degree.  Several hospital networks indicated that they would hire 11+ BS and 11+ AAS graduates per year with backgrounds in health care informatics. 

 

When asked if the respondents believed if a technology gap exists between the Information Systems professionals and clinical professionals at their facilities, 71% felt that a gap exists.

 

Additionally, the survey asked respondents to rank essential skills needed by health care informatics professionals to be successful in a health care setting. It should be noted that 60.8% of respondents listed knowledge of health care information software systems among the top three essential skills.  A broad understanding of health care professions ranked high for all respondents.  Other ranked essential skills include interpersonal communication skills; database management, programming, and software development skills; training and presentation skills; clinical experience; and, system analysis skills.  The results of these rankings were taken into consideration in the design of the curriculum.  A strong component of anatomy, physiology, and chemistry is required for students to understand much of the terminology and technology of the health care field.

 

Further, St. James Healthcare and its sister hospitals have requested this degree program to respond to needs that exist within their nine hospital facilities as well as in their corporate headquarters.  St. James Healthcare believes that their needs are reflective of larger, national needs within the healthcare industry.  While there are over 6,000 hospitals nationwide, these represent only a fraction of the allied healthcare industry.

 

3.          Explain how the program relates to the Role and Scope of the institution as established by the Board of Regents.

 

The proposed degree program in Health Care Informatics offers a unique blend of computer and information technology, clinical, and communication coursework.  The technical and science nature of the degree fits nicely within the College of Mathematics and Sciences which houses both Computer Science and Nursing.  Montana Tech currently has related degree programs in Nursing (LPN and ASRN), Biological Sciences, Computer Science, Software Engineering, Information Technology and Design, Professional and Technical Communications, and Business and Information Technology that all stand to complement this newly proposed degree.  Montana Tech’s College of Technology has offered education for practical nurses since 1974.  Montana Tech’s computer science program was added to the college in 1981.  This innovative program blends existing academic programs into a new degree that will provide highly trained and skilled interns and graduates to hospitals and health care facilities to bridge the growing technology gap between clinical and information systems professionals.  This proposed degree is certainly within the role and scope of Montana Tech and is in direct response to an industry request for professionals with AAS and BS degrees in Health Care Informatics.  Further, this program fits well with The University of Montana’s strategic plan to “…Conduct a needs assessment and develop new baccalaureate program proposals and secure approval to offer them through the appropriate campus, with specific attention to tourism and resort management, health care administration, and information systems and management.”

 

4.          Please state what effect, if any, the proposed program will have on the administrative structure of the institution.  Also indicate the potential involvement of other departments, divisions, colleges, or schools.

 

The proposed degree will reside within the College of Mathematics and Sciences with instruction occurring at both Montana Tech (north campus) and its College of Technology (south campus).  A department head will be identified and faculty will be added according to the schedule provided on page 6.  The department head will be responsible for the development, implementation, and evaluation of the AAS and BS degrees in Healthcare Informatics.  A high level of cooperation is proposed between the College’s two campuses, similar to what has been accomplished with the College’s Nursing program.

 

General education courses will be taught by qualified faculty at both campuses.  A substantial number of courses will be taught by current, qualified instructors at both campuses.  The Computer Science and Health Care Informatics core courses will be taught by new, qualified instructors.  Where possible, distance education courses from programs such as the Health Information Technology program at MSU-Great Falls College of Technology will be used within the curriculum.

 

5.          Describe the extent to which similar programs are offered in Montana, the Pacific Northwest, and states bordering Montana.  How similar are these programs to the one herein proposed?

 

Although degree programs are available at the Master of Science level in areas of Nursing Informatics, Bioinformatics, and Medical Informatics, no known programs are available nationally in Health Care Informatics at either the Associate or Bachelors levels.  Regionally, Masters of Science Degrees in health care related areas of Informatics are available at the Oregon Health Sciences University, the University of Utah, University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, and the University of Washington.  No programs in Health Care Informatics are available in Montana

 

A related program in Health Information Technology is available at the MSU-Great Falls College of Technology.  The programs differ in their approach to data and information management in a health care setting.  The MSU-Great Falls College of Technology program takes an applied approach to traditional medical information data management whereas the proposed degree in Health Care Informatics approaches data management from a new, non-traditional “informatics” perspective.  The proposed program examines not only how to manage existing health care data, but how to integrate systems to improve the utility and quality of data in a health care setting.

 

Montana Tech expects to set the national standard for the undergraduate degree in Health Care Informatics.  Fairmont State University in West Virginia has already expressed strong interest in developing a similar program and in establishing ties to the National Center for Health Care Informatics.

 

The regional and national MS programs are very specialized and concentrate on very specific niche areas of health care informatics.  Graduates of these programs fill very specific roles within areas of nursing, biomedicine, and medicine.  The proposed undergraduate degrees in Health Care Informatics at Montana Tech will be broad-based and designed to provide graduates who can fill a growing technology gap that exists between clinicians and computer information specialists within hospitals, clinics, and many allied areas of healthcare.  Since this is a new and emerging specialization, Montana Tech is working with industry professionals and health care informatics experts to design and develop a degree program that meets the needs of the health care industry while remaining flexible to the ever-changing technological advances in the health care industry.  These industry representatives and informatics experts will be asked to serve on an industry advisory board for the degree programs.

 

6.          Please name any accrediting agency(ies) or learned society(ies) that would be concerned with the particular program herein proposed.  How has this program been developed in accordance with the criteria developed by said accrediting body(ies) or learned society(ies)?

 

Since this is a new, emerging field of specialization within the health care industry, no accrediting bodies or agencies have been established for review or accreditation.  National and international societies, associations, or institutes have been established to promote a better understanding of health care information and management systems.  Examples of these domestic organizations include the Healthcare Information and Management Systems Society, the Medical Records Institute, the American Telemedicine Association, the American Medical Informatics Association, and the American Health Information Management Association.

 

7.          Prepare an outline of the proposed curriculum showing course titles and credits.  Please include any plans for expansion of the program during its first three years.

 

Following is the draft curriculum for the AAS and BS degrees in Health Care Informatics.  Students completing the first two years of the program will graduate with an Associate of Applied Science (AAS) degree.  Students completing the entire curriculum will graduate with a Bachelors of Science (BS) degree.   General education requirements (GERs) are met at both the AAS and BS levels in the curriculum.  No additional plans for expansion are anticipated during the first three years of the program.

 

I.                  Freshman Year

Fall

Spring

HCI 1016

Intro. to Health Care Informatics

2 Cr.

HCI 1106

The Language of Health Care Informatics

3 Cr.

MATH 1056 or Math 1026

College Algebra*

Intermediate Algebra

3 Cr.

CHEM 1016

Intro. to Chemistry

3 Cr.

PSYC 1000

General Psychology**

3 Cr.

CHEM 1106

Health Chemistry Lab.

1 Cr.

I.T. 1416

Computer Software**

3 Cr.

I.T. 0249

Database I

3 Cr.

ENGL 1046

English Composition

3 Cr.

HCI 1206

Core Concepts in Computer Utilization

4 Cr.

HSS 1746

Intro to Sociology

3 Cr.

 

 

 

 

 

17 Cr.

 

 

14 Cr.

II.                Sophomore Year

Fall

Spring

BIOL 2016

Anat. & Physiol. I

5 Cr.

BIOL 2026

Anat. & Physiol. II

5 Cr.

BUS 0102

Accounting Proc. I

3 Cr.

I.T. 0243

Spreadsheets I*

3 Cr.

BUS 0207

Med. Coding & Billing

3 Cr.

HCI 2256

Data, Inform. & Know.

2 Cr.

HCI 2156

Health Care Facility  Procedures

3 Cr.

HCI 2306

Overview of HCI Sys.

4 Cr.

PTC 2146

Presenting Tech. Infor.

2 Cr.

Bus 0205

Business Communication

3 cr.

 

 

16 Cr.

 

 

17 Cr.

 

Total Credit Hours to Complete AAS

64 cr.

 

Students completing the first two years of the program will exit with an Associate of Applied Science (AAS) degree in Health Care Informatics.  Completion of the AAS program requires 64 credit hours.  Students exiting the AAS program will be required to apply for admission to the upper division. 

 

III.                Junior Year

Fall

Spring

MATH 1326

Elem. Stat. & Prob.

3 Cr.

Math 4356

Statistical Computing & Data

3 Cr.

C.S. 3XX6

Survey of Comp. Sci. I

3 Cr.

C.S. 3XX6

Survey of Comp. Sci. II

3 Cr.

HCI 3106

Health Care in the US I

3 Cr.

HCI 3126

Health Care in the US II

3 Cr.

ENGL 3896

Bus. & Prof. Writing**

3 Cr.

BUS 3656

Organizational Behav.

3 Cr.

HSS 3376

Professional Ethics**

3 Cr.

XXX6

Humanities Elective

3 Cr

 

 

15 Cr.

 

 

15 Cr.

IV.               Senior Year

Fall

Spring

C.S. 4XX6

Database Principles

3 Cr.

HCI 4306

HCI Practicum

6 Cr.

C.S. 4XX6

Decision Support Systems

3 Cr.

HCI 4406

HCI Internship

6 Cr.

HCI 4106

Health Care Systems Lifecycles

3 Cr.

 

 

 

HCI 4206

Issues in HCI

2 Cr.

 

BUS 3416

Business Law I

3 Cr.

 

 

 

 

 

14 Cr.

 

 

12 Cr.

Total Credit Hours to Complete Bachelor of Science Degree

120 Cr.

 

*Completion required for entry into the upper division

** Course Available On-Line

See Attachment D. for course descriptions.

 

The Health Care Informatics degree is a well-balanced degree with a very strong technology component.  The BS degree includes 14 credits of science, 25 credits of information technology, 9 credits of mathematics, 37 credits of health care informatics, 12 credits of business, 11 credits of communications, and 12 credits of humanities and social sciences.

 

FACULTY AND STAFF REQUIREMENTS

 

1.                   Please indicate, by name and rank, current faculty what will be involved with the program proposed herein.

 

Numerous faculty on the Montana Tech campus will be involved in instruction for the Health Care Informatics curriculum.  Of the 120 credit hours of instruction in the degree program, 43 credits will be taught by computer science faculty and new Health Care Informatics faculty, 12 credits will be taught by computer science faculty, and 65 credit hours will be taught by existing faculty members.  Faculty members directly involved in the program are:

 

Faculty Name

Title

Degree(s)

Karen VanDaveer

Director of Nursing

B.S. Nursing, Montana State University

M.S. Nursing, Montana State University

Doug Coe

Dean, College of Mathematics and Sciences

B.S. Chemistry, Montana State University

Ph.D. Chemistry, Oregon State University

Danette Melvin

Nursing Instructor

B.A. Nursing, Carroll College

M.S. Nursing Informatics, Excelsior College – Fall 2001

Chris Boroni

Assistant Professor, Computer Science

B.S. Computer Science, Montana Tech

M.S., Ph.D. Computer Science, MSU (Fall 2001)

Jeffrey Braun

Assistant Professor, Computer Science

B.S. Geophysical Engineering, Colorado School of Mines

M.S. Geophysics, University of Utah

M.S. Computer Science, UM

Michael Grinder

Assistant Professor, Computer Science

B.S. Computer Science, MSU

Ph.D. Electrical and Computer Engineering, MSU (summer 2001)

Debbie Rossi

Adjunct Mathematics and Computer Science Faculty

B.S. Animal Science, University of Minnesota

M.S. Quantitative Genetics, Oregon State Univ.

M.S. Statistics, Oregon State University

 

Additionally, Montana Tech anticipates that adjunct faculty representing information systems (IS) companies in the healthcare industry will be used for IS-specific instruction.

 

2.                   Please project the need for new faculty over the first five-year program.  Include special qualifications or training.  If present faculty are to conduct the new program, please explain how they will be relieved from present duties.

 

Following are the anticipated staffing projections for the new degree program for the first five academic years of the program for the Health Care Informatics courses.  Please refer to the detailed budget for additional staffing needs in other academic areas.

 

New Health Care Informatics and Computer Science faculty hired for this program will be required to have specialization in informatics, particularly in relation to the health care industry. 

 

3.                   Please explain the need and cost for support personnel or other required personnel expenditures.

 

Montana Tech anticipates strong enrollment growth in its programs in Health Care Informatics during its first five years in operation.  While this projected growth is sizable, Montana Tech currently has adequate staffing in its student services areas to accommodate student needs in Admissions, Financial Aid, Registration, Counseling, Testing, and other student service areas. 

 

Additional personnel will be required to support the academic needs of these programs.  A department head will be appointed and given ¼-time release for these responsibilities.  Additionally, a ½-time administrative support position and ¼-time computer support position will be required.

 


 
CAPITAL OUTLAY, OPERATING EXPENDITURES, AND PHYSICAL FACILITIES

 

1.                   Please summarize operating expenditure needs.

 

Professional development for faculty instructing informatics coursework is mandatory in order to keep current in their profession.  All faculty will have the opportunity to attend continuing education conferences, workshops, and professional organization meetings to maintain quality in the program. 

 

Montana Tech’s current computer hardware and software infrastructure is adequate to meet most of the computing needs within the degree program.  Specialized healthcare information management software will be a necessary component of the student’s instruction.  Two additional servers will be needed to house the information management software.  Donations of software and software support services from leading healthcare information systems (IS) software companies will be sought to equip the primary computer laboratory to be used by the HCI students.  If appropriations are received for The National Center for Health Care Informatics, computer hardware and software will be provided in the laboratories in the Center.  National corporate sponsors will be solicited to support the ongoing hardware and software needs of the Center and the degree programs.

 

2.                   Please evaluate library resources.  Are they adequate for operation of the proposed program?  If not, how will the library need to be strengthened during the next three years?

 

Library resources and instructional materials for the clinical, computer science, and technical communication components of this degree are comprehensive, up-to-date, and readily available. The library collections of the North and South campuses complement each other offering a broad range of materials to the students of both campuses.  Access to the following services are available through the Montana Tech Libraries:  Digger, the automated card catalog system for both campus libraries; WLN LaserCat, a bibliographic reference tool on CD-ROM providing all holdings currently listed on the WLN database and the internet; multiple databases and indexes; internet resources by subject; electronic journals; and, interlibrary loan capabilities. Health Care Informatics students will also benefit from access to materials located at the St. James Healthcare Library and the Butte Public Library.

 

Specific Health Care Informatics journals and textbooks will need to be evaluated and additional resources will need to be allocated to provide these texts and references to meet student research and study needs. 

 

3.                   Please indicate special clinical, laboratory, or computer equipment that will be needed.  List pieces of equipment or computer hardware presently available in the department.

 

The need to house large health care information management software packages will require the purchase of two large servers for the Health Care Informatics programs.  Software donations and software support services will be solicited from major health care information management software companies to be housed on these servers.  Maintenance of these servers and associated software packages will require the addition of a ¼-time computer support position. 

 

4.                   Please describe facilities and space required for the proposed program.  Are current facilities adequate for the program?  If not, how does the institution propose to provide new facilities.

 

Current facilities at both campuses are adequate for the instructional and laboratory needs of the program.  Faculty office space, however, will be required for faculty hired for the program.  If the NCHCI receives federal appropriations, a new 8,000 ft2 facility will be built and dedicated to many of the needs of the students and faculty within the Health Care Informatics program. 

 

EVALUATION OF PROPOSED PROGRAM

 

1.                   Please name faculty committees or councils that have reviewed and approved the program herein proposed.

 

The program was developed in cooperation with the Nursing, Computer Science, and Professional and Technical Communication faculty at Montana Tech, the Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs, the Dean of the College of Mathematics and Sciences, the Dean of the College of Technology, the Director of College Relations and Marketing, and the Human Resource Director at St. James Healthcare.  The degree was approved in concept as follows: November 9, 2000: Approval of the development process by the Montana Tech Dean’s Council; April 26, 2001: Approved by the Montana Tech Curriculum Review Committee; and, May 3, 2001: Approved by the full faculty of Montana Tech.

 

2.                   If outside consultants have been employed, please list the names of these consultants, their current positions, and titles.  Append copies of their written reports (this is required of new doctoral programs).

 

No outside consultants have been employed.

 

FISCAL IMPACT AND BUDGET INFORMATION

 

On this form, indicate the planned FTE enrollment, estimated expenditures, and projected revenues for the first three years of the program.  Include both the reallocation of existing resources and anticipated or requested new resources.  Second and third year estimates should be in constant dollars.

 

FISCAL IMPACT AND BUDGET INFORMATION

*FTE based on 15 cr/semester

FY 2001 First Year

FY 2002 Second Year

FY 2003 Third Year

 

 

FTE

Headcount

FTE

Headcount

FTE

 Headcount

I.   PLANNED STUDENT ENROLLMENT

A. New Enrollment

50.80

50.00

69.70

68.00

112.50

110.00

B. Shifting Enrollment

 

 

46.70

50.00

64.70

68.00

TOTAL  ENROLLMENT

50.80

50.00

116.40

118.00

177.20

178.00

 

First Year

Second Year

Third Year

 

 

FTE

Cost

FTE

Cost

FTE

Cost

II. EXPENDITURES

A. Personnel Cost

1. Faculty

1.00

45,000.00

2.00

90,000.00

2.00

90,000.00

2. Administrators

0.10

5,000.00

 

 

 

 

3. Adjunct Faculty

 

 

 

 

 

 

Computer Science

0.25

10,000.00

0.50

20,000.00

0.50

20,000.00

English

0.20

4,800.00

0.30

7,200.00

0.40

9,600.00

Chemistry

0.20

3,050.00

0.40

6,100.00

0.60

9,000.00

Biology

 

 

0.20

3,200.00

0.40

6,400.00

Mathematics

0.20

4,800.00

0.40

9,600.00

0.40

9,600.00

Information Technology

0.20

4,800.00

0.50

12,000.00

0.80

19,200.00

PTC

 

 

0.10

2,400.00

0.20

4,800.00

Business

 

 

0.10

2,400.00

0.20

4,800.00

4. Graduate Assistants

 

 

 

 

 

 

5. Research Personnel

 

 

 

 

 

 

6. Support Personnel

0.50

15,000.00

0.50

15,000.00

0.50

15,000.00

7. Fringe Benefits (@25%)

 

23,112.50

 

41,975.00

 

47,100.00

8. Other(0.25 time computer  coordinator)

12,500.00

 

12,500.00

 

12,500.00

Total Personnel FTE And Cost

2.65

$128,062.50

5.00

$222,375.00

6.00

$248,000.00

B. Operating Expenditures

 

 

 

 

 

 

1. Travel

 

1,500.00

 

3,000.00

 

3,000.00

2. Professional Services

 

 

 

 

 

 

3. Other Services

 

4,250.00

 

9,500.00

 

9,500.00

4. Communications

 

500.00

 

1,000.00

 

1,000.00

5. Utilities

 

 

 

 

 

 

6. Materials and Supplies

 

3,000.00

 

3,500.00

 

3,500.00

7. Rentals

 

 

 

 

 

 

8. Repairs & Maintenance

 

 

 

 

 

 

9. Materials/Goods Resale

 

10. Miscellaneous

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Operating Expenditure

 

$9,250.00

 

$17,000.00

 

$17,000.00

 

 

First Year

Second Year

Third Year

FTE

Cost

FTE

Cost

FTE

Cost

C. Capital Outlay

1. Library Resources

 

700.00

 

1,000.00

 

1,000.00

2. Equipment (Servers/support of  computers)

25,000.00

 

10,000.00

 

10,000.00

(See letter of support from St. James Hospital)

 

Total Capital Outlay

 

$25,700.00

 

$11,000.00

 

$11,000.00

 

D. Physical Facilities

Construction or Major Renovation

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

E. Indirect Costs (overhead 4% of 7000/FTE)

140,000.00

 

330,400.00

 

498,400.00

 

GRAND TOTAL EXPENDITURES

$303,012.50

 

$580,775.00

 

$774,400.00

III.  REVENUES

FY 2000

FY 2001

FY 2002

First Year

Second Year

Third Year

 

FTE

Cost

FTE

Cost

FTE

Cost

A. Source of Funds

1. Appropriated Funds-Reallocation

 

 

 

 

 

 

2. Appropriated Funds-New($7000*.6 per student)

 

350,000.00

 

826,000.00

 

1,246,000.00

3. Federal Funds

 

 

 

 

 

 

4. Other Grants

 

 

 

 

 

 

5. Fees

 

 

 

 

 

 

6. Other(______)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

TOTAL SOURCE OF FUNDS

 

$350,000.00

 

$826,000.00

 

$1,246,000.00

B. Nature of funds

 

 

 

 

 

 

1. Recurring

 

 

 

 

 

 

2. Non-Recurring

 

 

 

 

 

 

GRAND TOTAL REVENUES

$46,987.50

 

$245,225.00

 

$471,600.00

 

 

Attachment A.

 

Proposal for the National Center

for Health Care Informatics

An Overview of

The National Center

 for Health Care Informatics - Butte, Montana

 A Cooperative Venture Between St. James Healthcare and Montana Tech of the University of Montana

"We face an alarming reality in the health care industry today.  The gap between the clinical and information technology sides of the health care industry continues to grow.  We need a solution to fill the gap.  The National Center for Health Care Informatics is that solution."

 

St. James Healthcare and Montana Tech of the University of Montana, both located in Butte, Montana, are working jointly to create The National Center for Health Care Informatics.  This center will house laboratories, classrooms, and internship sites for a newly proposed Associate through Bachelors degree in Health Care Informatics at Montana Tech.  “Health Care Informatics” is an emerging specialization in the health care industry that joins the disciplines of information technology and health care administration.

 

According to the US Department of Commerce, the health care industry worldwide has become increasingly reliant upon technology and information management. This has resulted in a significant technology transfer gap between those professionals entrusted to provide clinical care and those who design and manage the complex information systems required to operate today’s multifaceted medical system.  This gap threatens the effective and efficient management of health care information surrounding the patient. Establishing a center in Butte that focuses on an educational program in the informational aspects of health care will ensure that Montana, and all of America, maximizes the use of technology to improve health care.  It will meet the growing challenge of integrating the clinical and information components of the modern health care industry.  It will also provide important educational and employment opportunities for Montana residents, particularly in Southwestern Montana where unemployment remains high due to a steady decline in the mining and timber industries.  When fully operational, the Center and program will add significantly to the economy of Butte.

 

St. James Healthcare and Montana Tech have requested a federal appropriation of $800,000 in FY 2002 to provide initial capital funding for the Center.  This appropriation is needed to administer, permit, design, and construct alaboratory and classroom facility at St. James Healthcare to house the Center.  Future private and federal funds and/or grants will be sought to obtain computer software, hardware and distance education infrastructure needs of the facility.

 

The National Center for Health Care Informatics has the established following goals for enhancing the educational and employment opportunities in the health care field for Montana and the nation:

q  Develop, administer, and deliver the internship and distance education components of a newly proposed degree program in Health Care Informatics at Montana Tech to be offered at the Associate through Bachelors levels in both a traditional classroom setting and through distance education capabilities;

q  Establish a national reference and network center for health care professionals practicing in the area of information technology;

q  Institute a corporate sponsorship program to (a) assist with development efforts, (b) establish applied internship settings for students and permanent placements for graduates, (c) supply educational, software, hardware, and training resources, and (d) provide a long-term funding source for the Center;

q  Establish a continuing education resource to provide distance learning opportunities for professionals working in health care with an emphasis on rural health care;

q  Ensure the competency of practicing health care informaticists through a professional certification mechanism and the delivery of competency-based continuing education coursework;

q  Provide educational programs designed to retain qualified health care professionals through a workforce transition program; and,

q  Provide highly trained and skilled interns and graduates to hospitals and health care facilities to bridge the growing technology gap between clinical and information systems professionals.

 

The health care industry increasingly needs professionals trained with a unique combination of clinical and computer science skills.  Funding for this Center will develop skilled and trained professionals that can effectively use new technology to maximize the quality of health care.  This resource is particularly critical in a state like Montana that is increasingly dependent on technology to bring quality health care to isolated rural communities.

 

 

Attachment B.

 

Letter of Support

St. James Healthcare

         May 4, 2001

 

Dr. Frank Gilmore

Chancellor

Montana Tech

1300 W. Park Street

Butte, MT  59701

 

Dear Dr. Gilmore:

 

On behalf of St. James Healthcare, I am pleased to endorse the partnership between St. James Healthcare and Montana Tech to establish a new degree program in Health Care Informatics.  This new degree program, which will be offered on both campuses of Montana Tech and at St. James Health Care facilities, is an exciting new development.  We are pleased to play a role as Montana Tech continues to expand and grow its health care and computer science-related programs. 

 

As technology rapidly expands into all areas of health care, a need exists for well-trained and qualified individuals who possess a unique combination of skills in clinical work and computer information technology.  Montana Tech’s degree program will deliver informatics professionals qualified to serve in this critical capacity.  Currently, this need is going virtually unmet within the healthcare industry.  I commend Montana Tech for its vision and responsiveness in bringing forth a proposal to establish this new degree program. 

 

St. James Healthcare is pleased to be a partner with Montana Tech in making this program a success and is willing to commit to the following:

q    A partnership between Montana Tech and St. James Health Care will anchor a very unique program with huge industry demand and outstanding opportunities for growth.

q    St. James Healthcare and its sister hospitals are recognized leaders in health care and will play an important role in bringing corporate support, sponsorships, and educational resources to this program.

q    A proposed future expansion of the physical facilities at St. James Healthcare could provide a state-of-the-art training facility for health care information specialists and possibilities for life-long learning through a distance education capability.  This National Center for Health Care Informatics would be designed to meet the expanding educational requirements of rural health care facilities.  Additionally, given its close proximity to Montana Tech, this facility is uniquely suited to meeting the needs of students.

q    St. James Healthcare will commit advertising resources to assist Montana Tech in attracting the very best students into these new degree areas.

q    St. James Healthcare will commit substantial scholarship support to students enrolled in these degree programs.

q    St. James Healthcare will make its facilities and information systems available to students involved in education and internship opportunities.

 

The management of St. James Healthcare has fully endorsed our partnership with Montana Tech and is prepared to commit resources to help make these programs successful.  We are extremely excited about the possibilities presented by this partnership and look forward to a long and productive working relationship with Montana Tech.

 

Sincerely,

 

 

Patrick Dudley

Director, Human Resources

St. James Healthcare

 

 

Attachment C.

 

Health Care Industry Survey Results

 

Health Care Informatics Survey Analysis

 

Calley S. Jones, Intern

B.S. Mathematics 2001

Montana Tech

 

Montana Tech of the University of Montana

& St. James Healthcare

 

May 31, 2001

 

Health Care Informatics Survey Analysis

 

Introduction

 

Pursuant to the development of the National Center for Health Care Informatics, a survey was conducted by Montana Tech in collaboration with St. James Community Hospital to aid in determining the needs and purposes of the proposed Health Care Informatics degree.  The survey was intended to gather information from various health care providers, regarding their opinions of the proposed degree, the necessary skills of health care informatics professionals, and the marketability of prospective graduates. 

 

Methods

 

The population of interest was the health care providers in the United States.  A full list of these facilities was available in book form from the American Hospital Association.  Five types of health care facilities were selected as strata within the sample:  hospitals, long-term care facilities, HMOs, networks, and Blue Cross/Blue Shield agencies.  From the AHA 2001 Guide, a stratified systematic survey sample was collected.  The table below summarizes the population size (N) and the number of mailed surveys (n*) for each strata.

 

Strata

N

n*

Hospital

6000

100

Long-term Care Facility

2350

50

HMO

700

50

Network

1750

50

Blue Cross/Blue Shield

50

50

 

Each of the selected facilities was mailed the survey, with a self-addressed stamped envelope.  The returned surveys comprised the experimental sample.

 

Because of the nature of survey sampling, there is a high likelihood of a very skewed sample from this sampling plan.  This bias occurs first because not all facilities were able to respond, due to restrictions on survey response, and secondly because those facilities with HCI needs are more likely to respond.  Therefore, these findings should not be used to extrapolate outside of this sample setting.

 

Results

 

For questions that called for a qualitative answer, such as question (3) which rates information exchange on a scale from Very Poor to Very Good, the results were coded into qualitative variables for ease of analysis.  Each level was assigned a value, such as Very Poor = 1, Adequate = 3, and Very Good = 5.  The results were then analyzed using descriptive statistics in MINITAB. 

For questions that called for a Yes or No answer, such as question (4), the results were coded with Yes = 1 and No = 0, then modeled using a binomial distribution for calculating the standard error.  For the binomial, the statistic p*, the sample proportion, is the number of Yes responses divided by the sample size.  Then, the standard error is given by

 

SE = Sqrt [p*(1-p*)]

 

There were a total of 51 respondents, for a sample size of n = 51.  The breakdown of the respondents, by facility and community size, appears in Table 1.  With such a small sample size relative to the population size, no inferences can be made with any statistical validity.  All means are given with standard errors as a measure of accuracy.

 

Because of the stratification of the sample, the data analyses are best presented in table form.  The responses to the survey questions are summarized in the attached tables. 

 

Another aim of the survey process was to provide insight into the development of the HCI curriculum at Montana Tech.  To this end, the survey respondents were asked to prioritize some skills that a HCI professional should display.  The results of this question are displayed in Table 9.  It should be noted that 60.8% of respondents listed “Knowledge of Health Care Information Software Systems” among the top 3 essential skills. 

 

Further respondent comments are attached in the appendix. 

 

Appendix

 

Table 1  Survey Respondents                                                      p. 5

Table 2  Information Exchange Rating                                           p. 5

Table 3  Adequate Staffing                                                           p. 5

Table 4  Availability of Qualified Candidates                                   p. 6

Table 5  Importance of a HCI Background                                     p. 6

Table 6  Hiring                                                                            p. 6

Table 7  Hiring Numbers                                                              p. 7

Table 8  Technology Communication Gap                                     p. 7

Table 9  Essential Skills                                                              p. 8

Additional Comments                                                                  p. 9

 

 

Table 1            Survey Respondents

 

Type

Sample Size

Urban

Semi-rural

Rural

Hospital

27

8

4

15

Long Term Care

10

8

2

0

HMO

4

3

1

0

Network

4

3

1

0

Blue Cross

5

4

1

0

Health Dept

1

0

0

1

Overall

51

26

9

16

 

Table 2            Information Exchange Rating

Q:  How would you describe the exchange of information between the clinical professionals and information management professionals at your facility?

1 = Very Poor, 3 = Adequate, 5 = Very Good      

 

Information Exchange

Mean

SE

Hospital

3.148

0.157

Long Term Care

3.200

0.359

HMO

3.750

0.250

Network

2.500

0.500

Blue Cross

3.600

0.510

Health Dept

4.000

0.000

Overall

3.216

0.129

 

Table 3            Adequate Staffing

Q:  Do you currently have adequate staffing to meet the information systems needs of your facility?

 

Adequate Staffing

%Yes

%No

SE

Hospital

40.74%

59.26%

49.14%

Long Term Care

40.00%

60.00%

48.99%

HMO

25.00%

75.00%

43.30%

Network

25.00%

75.00%

43.30%

Blue Cross

40.00%

60.00%

48.99%

Health Dept

100.00%

0.00%

0.00%

Overall

39.22%

60.78%

48.82%

 

Table 4            Availability of Qualified Candidates

Q:  In your dealing with prospective candidates for information systems positions at your facility, do you feel that there are available candidates with adequate training for their fields?

 

Prospective Candidates

%Yes

%No

SE

Hospital

37.04%

62.96%

48.29%

Long Term Care

60.00%

40.00%

48.99%

HMO

75.00%

25.00%

43.30%

Network

25.00%

75.00%

43.30%

Blue Cross

80.00%

20.00%

40.00%

Health Dept

100.00%

0.00%

0.00%

Overall

49.02%

50.98%

49.99%

 

Table 5            Importance of a Health Care Informatics Background

Q:  How would you rank the importance of employees with a Health Care Informatics background in your facility/agency?

1 = Not needed, 3 = Important, 5 = Very Important

 

Importance of HCI Background

Mean

SE

Hospital

3.815

0.160

Long Term Care

3.100

0.348

HMO

4.000

0.707

Network

3.750

0.250

Blue Cross

4.200

0.490

Health Dept

2.000

0.000

Overall

3.686

0.139

 

Table 6            Hiring

Q:  Would you hire someone with a Health Care Informatics background at your facility? (Response is percent answering "Yes".)

Hiring

Bachelors

SE

Associates

SE

Hospital

77.78%

41.57%

92.59%

26.19%

Long Term Care

60.00%

48.99%

70.00%

45.83%

HMO

100.00%

0.00%

75.00%

43.30%

Network

75.00%

43.30%

100.00%

0.00%

Blue Cross

100.00%

0.00%

80.00%

40.00%

Health Dept

0.00%

0.00%

0.00%

0.00%

Overall

76.47%

42.42%

84.31%

36.37%

 

Table 7            Hiring Numbers

Q:  How many Health Care Informatics professionals could you hire annually at your facility?

 

Hiring Number

Bachelors

SE

Associates

SE

Hospital

1.19

0.39

0.85

0.07

Long Term Care

0.60

0.30

0.70

0.30

HMO

1.00

0.00

0.75

0.25

Network

3.00

2.67

3.25

2.59

Blue Cross

3.60

1.94

3.40

1.94

Health Dept

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

Overall

1.41

0.35

1.24

0.29

 

Table 8

Q:  Do you believe that a technology communication gap exists between the Information Systems professionals and clinical professionals at your facility?

(Response is percent answering "Yes".)

 

Gap

% Yes

SE

Hospital

81.48%

38.84%

Long Term Care

60.00%

48.99%

HMO

75.00%

43.30%

Network

50.00%

50.00%

Blue Cross

60.00%

48.99%

Health Dept

0.00%

0.00%

Overall

70.59%

45.56%

 

Table 9 Essential Skills

Q:  Please rank the three most essential skills that a Health Care Informatics professional will need to be successful in a health care setting, using 1 as the most important.

 

Essential Skills

 

Priority 1

 

 

Percent

 

1.

Knowledge of health care information software systems

23.5%

 

2.

Interpersonal communication

17.6%

 

3.

Database management

13.7%

 

 

Programming/Software development

13.7%

 

 

 

 

 

Priority 2

 

 

Percent

1.

Knowledge of health care information software systems

21.6%

 

2.

Training and presentation skills

15.7%

 

3.

Clinical experience

13.7%

 

 

 

 

 

 

Priority 3

 

 

Percent

1.

Broad understanding of health care professions

17.6%

 

2.

Knowledge of health care information software systems

15.7%

 

3.

Systems analysis skills

13.7%

 

 

Additional Comments

 

Urban HMO

Although we are understaffed, we are also not free to just go hire more people.  My responses reflect both of these realities.  In a managed care setting, I have found it much harder to find people who understand the world of managed care and also have good technical and analytical skills.  There are lots of people who can write in VB over SQL Server these days - the hard part is finding people who  understand the managed care industry.  We would put a high value on people who understood standard managed care reporting metrics such as days per thousand, PMPM calculations, and the HEDIS reporting suite, and also people who understand Internet security and how XML can turn HIPAA into an opportunity.

 

Rural Hospital

It is difficult to rate the items in 10 because all are very important

 

Urban Long Term Care

As a full service retirement community, our Health Care is only part of our operation. Although I see value to Health Care Informatics, I could not justify hiring on just that background.  We presently have 2 MIS personnel to work on the network and phone system for the corporation of 3 file servers and approximately 120 workstations / PCs.

 

Semi-rural hospital

Good luck on your program.  I hope it gets developed.  Two questions.  Would Montana Tech have

this as an on-campus or Internet type course?  Also, would also like to know if you have plans

for a graduate level degree for upper managers.

 

Greg Collins

Director - Information Systems

Bothwell Regional Health Center

601 E. 14th Street

Sedalia, MO 65301

 

Urban Long Term Care

All of our IS support is at corporate level in Toledo OH.  Overall computer knowledge at our facility is poor.

Urban Hospital

We currently have an informatics dept. staffed predominantly by ex-nurses.  All at bachelor plus levels, with six on staff.

 

Urban, Rural, and Semi-rural Long Term Care

Limited IS application at bedside, but 100% in business office, accounting.

 

Urban HMO

#1 skill:  Coding experience or training

 

Rural hospital

Project management skills

 

Semi-rural Blue Cross/Blue Shield

HC Informatics requires all of the skills articulated above.  We have a team with representatives from all areas.  In our environment, it’s pretty much impossible for 1 person to have this much breadth. Maybe you should have degrees with specialties, areas of expertise.

 

Urban Long Term Care

If this person is a HCI professional, they had better have all the other “skills”.

Rural hospital

Programs sound wonderful.

 

Semi-rural hospital

Hospital systems are unique to their environments, and there is a lack of standardization between organizations.  In our own organization we’re working with seven or eight different platforms (Meditech, UNIX, Windows 95/2000/XP/NT, Novelle, IBM 3270, various database formats and many differing analytical tools).  It can be a bit chaotic at times.  Individuals working in this environment need to be very flexible and calm in dealing with others.

 

Urban hospital

I would be interested in results.  We have several nurses/clinicians in our department, couldn’t/wouldn’t want to install without them.

Teri Baer, RN

Clinical applications manager

tbaer@bryanlgh.org

Lincoln, Nebraska

 

References

 

Sampling Opinions, Stephen and McCarthy, 1963.  John Wiley and Sons Science Editions.

Elementary Survey Sampling, Schaeffer, Mendenhall, and Ott, 1990.  PWS-Kent Publishing Company.

Elementary Statistics, M. Triola, 1995.  Addison-Wesley Publishing Company, Inc.

American Hospital Association 2001 Guide.

MINITAB Statistical Software, 2000.  MINITAB Corporation.

Microsoft Excel Spreadsheet Software, 1995 – 2000.  Microsoft Software Corporation.

 

 

Attachment D.

 

Course Descriptions for New Courses in

Health Care Informatics (HCI) and Computer Science (CS)

 

Course Descriptions for New Courses in

Health Care Informatics (HCI) and Computer Science (CS)

 

HCI 1016     Introduction to Health Care Informatics                 2 credits (2 hrs. lecture)

 

Designed to give students a broad introduction to the field of health care informatics, including definitions and industry applications. The history of informatics will be explored as well as the tools needed to support today’s health care technology demands.

 

HCI 1106     The Language of Health Care Informatics                             3 credits (3 hrs. lecture)

 

Designed to familiarize the student with modern health care and information systems terminology and taxonomies.

 

HCI 0120     HCI 1206         Core Concepts in Computer Utilization                         4 credits (2 hrs. lecture/6 hrs. lab)

 

Introduces the student to core concepts related to operating systems, programming, software usage, and computer maintenance & repair.

 

HCI 2156     Health Care Facility Procedures                                               3 credits (2 hrs. lect/3 hrs. lab)

 

Introduces students to concepts such as clinical records management, scheduling, order entry, inventory control and patient accounting. Students practice skills using the same software programs found in a variety of health care settings.

 

HCI 2256     Data, Information & Knowledge                                                2 credits (2 hrs. lecture)

 

Provides students with the opportunity to examine three concepts that are fundamental to the field of informatics—data, information and knowledge. The course focuses on database principles, health care classification systems and concepts of data set.

 

HCI 2306     Overview of HCI Systems                                                           4 credits (2 hrs. lecture/6 hrs. lab)               

 

Introduces the student to health care information management software products available and used in today’s health care workplace environment. Systems studied include inventory control, personnel staffing, diagnostic test results reporting, admission/discharge/transfer, care planning, billing, etc. Students are provided the opportunity to experience these programs firsthand in a laboratory setting.

 

HCI 3106     Health Care the U.S. I                                                   3 credits (1 hr. lecture/6 hrs. lab)

 

This course begins with an examination of the economics of health care in the United States today. The student next explores occupations within the health care field. Each position (ranging from CNA to CEO) is defined in terms of job responsibilities and use of information technologies. Opportunities will be provided to observe and interact with health care professionals in a variety of health care settings. 

 

HCI 3126     Health Care in the U.S. II                                                             3 credits (1 hr. lecture/6 hrs. lab)

 

A continuation of HCI 3106. Remaining health care professions and occupations are examined and observed.

 

HCI 4106     Health Care Systems Lifecycle                                                3 credits (2 hrs. lecture/3 hrs. lab)

 

Students learn to design health care informatics applications from “the ground up.” Methodologies for analyzing information needs and determining information requirements will be examined.  A systematic evaluation process will be introduced which includes economic and technology assessments.

 

HCI 4206     Issues in HCI                                                                  2 credits (2 hrs. lecture)

 

This course examines the professional political, social, ethical and legal ramifications of health care informatics.

 

HCI 4306     HCI Practicum                                                                               6 credits (12-18 hrs. lab)

 

Students work in groups and individually to identify and address potential roadblocks to effective implementation of information management systems within health care facilities. Opportunities to react to unexpected outcomes or events are provided within a laboratory setting.

 

HCI 4406     HCI Internship                                                                                6 credits (12-18 hrs. lab)

 

                      An off-campus internship that places the student within an assigned health care facility to complete a focused informatics needs assessment and work with facility staff to provide a solution for at least one identified informatics need within the facility.

 

CS 3XX6      Survey of Computer Science                                                    3 credits (3 hr. lecture)

 

                      This course covers an introduction to programming, hardware concepts, and logic techniques.

 

CS3XX6       Survey of Computer Science II                                                 3 credits (3 hr. lecture)

 

                      This course covers aspects of networking and basic data structures to assist the student in understanding HCI software systems

 

CS 4XX6      Principles of Database                                                             3 credits (3 hr. lecture)

 

                      Examines the design and use of databases including relational, network and hierarchical models. Explores contemporary health care database applications.

 

CS 4XX6      Decision Support Systems                                                      3 credits (3 hr. lecture)

 

                      Introduces the student to the concepts of expert systems, including an overview of Prolog language.  Explores contemporary health care decision support systems.