January 20-21, 2000

ITEM 106-201-R0300: Approval of Proposal to Implement a Correctional Officer Certificate Program, Dawson Community College, Glendive, Montana.

THAT: The Board of Regents of Higher Education authorizes Dawson Community College in Glendive, Montana to award a Correctional Officer Certificate to students who complete the requirements of a one-year program.

EXPLANATION: Justification for this request is based on the following:

Recently the State of Montana has constructed three Regional Correctional Facilities within its borders to accommodate an increasing number of criminals sentenced to confinement in the Department of Corrections. One of these facilities is located in Glendive, Montana and houses both Dawson County Detention and Montana State Prison inmates. Having qualified and skilled personnel to staff these institutions is important and necessary to ensure that sentences are carried out as ordered, and that the overall correctional system can function effectively and adequately.

Presently, Dawson Community College offers the only two-year Law Enforcement Degree in the state. Very few academic opportunities exist either in course work or formal degree programs for the correctional officer student within the state of Montana. Specifically, no one-year academic program exists for correctional officers. This request will allow students the opportunity to prepare themselves academically for employment in the correctional field in both public and private correctional institutions without having to leave the State of Montana.

 ATTACHMENT A

PROGRAM PROPOSAL

"CORRECTIONAL OFFICER"

ONE-YEAR CERTIFICATE PROGRAM

 

DAWSON COMMUNITY COLLEGE

GLENDIVE, MONTANA

CORRECTIONAL OFFICER CERTIFICATE

Program Description

A.        Introduction:

Dawson Community College (DCC) proposes to initiate a one-year certificate for Correction Officers as part of its Law Enforcement Program to augment extended education for current and/or potential correctional staff. The Montana Department of Corrections, headquartered in Helena, has recently opened three Regional Correctional Facilities within its borders to accommodate an increasing number of inmates sentenced to the Department of Corrections. One of these facilities, the Dawson County Law Enforcement Center and Adult Correctional Facility, houses inmates for Dawson County Detention plus one-hundred-forty-four beds for Montana State Prison inmates. In addition to these public facilities, the State’s first private prison, Crossroads Correctional Facility for adults, opened in Shelby, Montana in 1999.

B.        Proposed Program Title: Correctional Officer Certificate

C.        Length of Program: Certificate - One Year (Two Semesters)

D.        Credit Hours: 35 Credits

E.        Contact Hours: 525 hours of classroom instruction (based on a 50-minute hour)

F.         Proposed Implementation Date: Fall Semester 2000

Program Development and Documentation:

A.        Brief Description of the Proposal:

The Dawson County Law Enforcement Center and Adult Correctional Facility has a correctional staff of approximately 35 officers and is responsible for the supervision of prisoners who often include people suffering from developmental disabilities, mental impairment, substance abuse, poor health and low educational achievement. Correctional officers are responsible for maintaining order and control over those committed to custody and preventing their escape. Officers’ duties include supervision of inmates in living units, work assignments, treatment programs, and during transportation and visitations. Skills necessary to perform such duties require knowledge in law enforcement and corrections, as well as the social and behavioral sciences.

This Correctional Officer Certificate proposal involves the structuring of the one year certificate utilizing courses and personnel within the existing offerings of the DCC

Law Enforcement program. This certificate will enhance the prior training of correctional officers and provide them with the opportunity to further their education. Officers must be able to analyze situations and react quickly based on their training and human relations skills. Related skills in math, communications and computer literacy are also a part of this proposed certificate.

Expected Outcomes:

The student will be able to:

1.         Apply knowledge of the characteristics and needs of inmate populations, the roles and responsibilities of corrections' personnel, the legal and ethical requirements of correctional officers, and interpersonal communication skills to establish and maintain effective relationships in the corrections setting.

2.         Choose from a range of communication skills, discipline and supervision techniques, and emergency procedures to respond to behavior in the prison population with a minimizing and rehabilitative effect.

3.         Apply oral and written communication skills, computation skills, and computer skills to perform the duties of a Correctional Officer effectively.

4.         Recognize and respond effectively to the need for social, emotional, and physical well-being in the Correctional Officer.

B.        Appropriate Within Mission and Goals Statement:

The two year A.A.S. Degree Program in Law Enforcement at Dawson Community College is the only such program in the state and has established a positive working relationship with the Montana Law Enforcement Academy in Helena. The mission of the Law Enforcement Program at DCC is to afford its students a quality education founded on the principles of academic excellence and rigor. The curriculum should provide students with the skills necessary to obtain and maintain successful employment in the field upon graduation or to transfer on to a baccalaureate institution for further studies. Goals of the program are as follows: 1) The program will maintain its current degrees in Law Enforcement, Peace Officer Option, and Private Security Option, and it will develop new options as appropriate and relevant to the field. 2) The program will utilize current and relevant technology as appropriate to its degrees/options. 3) The program will assist students in the development of critical thinking and communication skills, and the ability to conceptualize ideas. 4) When relevant and appropriate, the program will pursue an active agenda in offering regional training for area law enforcement agencies.

C.        Need for the Program:

Most Montana correctional officers are high school graduates willing to work at a starting wage of approximately $7.00 to $8.00 per hour. While the Montana Law Enforcement Academy provides 120 hours (3 weeks) of basic training for correctional personnel, additional training is difficult to coordinate due to long distances for travel and limited financial resources. Correctional officers are often on the job before they receive the academy training. Thus, Dawson Community College proposes an initial one year certificate for Correctional Officers as part of its Law Enforcement Program to augment extended education for current and/or potential correctional staff. In addition to on campus offerings, DCC currently delivers course work to a surrounding regional area covering approximately the Eastern 1/3 of Montana through its distance learning ITV network encompassing the counties of Dawson, Wibaux, Fallon, Prairie, Carter, Powder, Custer, McCone, Richland, Roosevelt, Sheridan, Daniels, Valley, Rosebud, and Treasure.

D.        Student Demand for the Program:

Interest in a Correctional Officer Certificate program has been demonstrated by an increase in the numbers of Law Enforcement majors opting to take several corrections-related elective courses. In addition, a number of graduates from the Law Enforcement program have gained employment with the Dawson County Law Enforcement Center as correctional officers. They, along with members of the Law Enforcement Program’s Advisory Committee and local corrections professionals have encouraged DCC to establish a program designed to prepare students for employment as correctional officers and to allow current officers the opportunity to further their education.

E.        Advisory Committee:

The Law Enforcement Advisory Committee recommended implementation of this certificate program in conjunction with the opening of the Dawson County Law Enforcement Center and Adult Correctional Facility in the Fall of 1998. Members for the Law Enforcement Advisory Committee are as follows:

Holly Dershem-Bruce -

Law Enforcement Program Director

Majel Dominguez -

DCC Instructor

Kathleen Fritsch -

DCC Instructor

Chief Mike Gaub -

Glendive Police Department

Undersheriff Wally Peter-

Dawson County Sheriff’s Department

Captain Jeff Walters -

Dawson County Adult Correctional Facility

John Dershem-Bruce -

Correctional Officer, DCACF

The Honorable Ed Williamson-

City of Glendive Judge/DCC Instructor

Sergeant Butch Huseby -

Montana Highway Patrol

TBA

Freshman LE Student Representative

TBA

Sophomore LE Student Representative

F.         Articulation with Public Secondary Schools:

As the lead, post-secondary institution of the Eastern Montana Tech Prep Consortium, Dawson Community College coordinates tech-prep credits with area high schools in several subjects relevant to the Correctional Officer Certificate including courses in computers and math.

G.        Articulation with Higher Education Institutions:

Students enrolled in the A.A.S. Law Enforcement curriculum at DCC are advised on an individual basis that their credits will transfer to four year schools as specific program requirements or as general electives. DCC is fully accredited by the Northwest Association of Schools and Colleges. Students receiving the A.A.S. degree in Law Enforcement are advised to take the additional fifteen credits in the general education core to complete the A.A. transfer degree. DCC Law Enforcement graduates have successfully transferred to the University of Great Falls, Minot State University, Montana State University, Eastern Washington University, the University of Montana, and many other four year institutions.

H.        Coordination with Other Work Force Training Sources:

DCC has coordinated its Law Enforcement curriculum with the Montana Law Enforcement Academy in Helena and the Montana Department of Corrections. In addition, DCC offers a regular schedule of regional training courses and workshops for peace officers, correctional officers, and other criminal justice professionals.

I.          Resources:

The proposed certificate builds on Dawson Community College’s reputation of offering the only two-year law enforcement degree in the state. Curriculum and library resources are already in place to adequately meet the needs of students seeking the one-year Correctional Officer Certificate. In addition, classroom space will not be over burdened with the addition of this program.

Likewise, this Certificate program will not require the addition of any new faculty members as DCC already has qualified instructors on staff including at least one Ph.D. with prior experience in the field of corrections as a probation officer.

J.         Community Participation:

Members of the Law Enforcement Advisory Committee are representative of the constituencies that will benefit from this Certificate program including members from the local Dawson County Law Enforcement Center and Adult Correctional Facility. DCC also offers a fieldwork program that, in addition to law enforcement patrol experience, also requires that students experience on-site placement in the local correctional facility. Internships are also available locally for students desiring more in-depth, hands-on experience as a correctional officer.

K. Impact on Other Programs at DCC:

The addition of this program will have minimal impact on the other programs and courses offered at Dawson Community College as it incorporates pre-existing curriculum.

L.         Evolution of the Program Concept:

Dawson Community College was encouraged to establish this Correctional Officer Certificate in conjunction with the opening of the Montana Department of Corrections Regional Prison in Glendive. The Certificate Program was presented to and approved by both the Law Enforcement Advisory Committee and the DCC Academic Affairs Committee in the Spring of 1998. More recently, the curriculum requirements were fine-tuned and approved by both committees after several DCC faculty instructed portions of the Montana Law Enforcement Academy’s Corrections/Detention Officer Basic #26 Course that was offered in Glendive in August of 1998 for new employees of the Dawson County Adult Correctional Facility. Finally, the establishment of this program also fulfills one of the goals of the Law Enforcement Program at DCC, namely the establishment of new curriculums and programs as appropriate to the region.

M. Program Costs:

No additional funding requests are anticipated to provide a one-year certificate program. All required courses are currently part of the DCC Law Enforcement curriculum and taught on a regular basis. Additional courses are also available should the student choose to enroll for more than the minimum 35 credits required for the certificate.

N.        Enrollment Impact and Expected Revenues:

Enrollment Impact:

5 Annualized FTE minimum

8 Annualized FTE maximum

 

Expected Revenue:

Minimum:

            Tuition and Fees (5 students)

$ 9,250.00

            FTE Reimbursement           

$12,750.00

            Minimum Revenue               

$22,000.00

Maximum:

            Tuition and Fees (8 students)

$14,800.00

            FTE Reimbursement

$20,400.00

            Maximum Revenue

$35,200.00

Curriculum: 35 semester credits

Course List:

Communications (9 credits):

LE 109

Police Report Writing

3

EN 095

English Essentials OR

EN 101

Composition I

3

SD 101

Public Speaking

3

Mathematics and Computer Applications (6 credits):

CA 109

Integrated Software OR

CA 112

Word Processing

3

MA 095

Beginning Algebra OR

MA 100

Intermediate Algebra

3

Social Sciences (9 credits):

PY 103

General Psychology

3

SO 103

Principles of Sociology

3

SO 225

Deviant Behavior OR

SO 207

Criminology

3

Corrections Core (11 credits):

LE 205

Corrections

3

LE 203

Criminal Evidence and Procedure

3

LE 245

Security Systems

3

LE 280

Defensive Tactics

1

HL 103

First Aid and CPR

1

Recommended Electives:

LE 103

Administration of Justice

3

LE 106

Police Firearms

2

LE 110

Interviewing and Interrogations

1

LE 201

Criminal Law

3

LE 209

Criminal Investigations

3

LE 225

Introduction to Security

3

PY 120

Stress Management

2

SO 209

Juvenile Delinquency

3

PE 106/206

107/207

Conditioning and Fitness

1/1/1/1

HL 231

Drugs, Society and Human Behavior

3

Sequence of Courses

First Semester:

 

Credit Hrs.

LE 109

Police Report Writing

3

LE 205

Corrections

3

SO 103

Principles of Sociology

3

EN 095

English Essentials OR

 

EN 101

Composition I

3

CA 109

Integrated Software OR

 

CA 112

Word Processing

3

SD 101

Public Speaking

3

Second Semester:

LE 203

Criminal Evidence and Procedure

3

LE 245

Security Systems

3

LE 280

Defensive Tactics

1

PY 103

General Psychology

3

MA 095

Beginning Algebra OR

 

MA 100

Intermediate Algebra

3

SO 225

Deviant Behavior OR

 

SO 207

Criminology

3

HL 103

First Aid and CPR

1

Recommended Electives:

LE 103

Administration of Justice

3

LE 106

Police Firearms

2

LE 110

Interviewing and Interrogations

1

LE 201

Criminal Law

3

LE 209

Criminal Investigations

3

LE 225

Introduction to Security

3

PY 120

Stress Management

2

SO 209

Juvenile Delinquency

3

PE 106/206/107/207

Conditioning and Fitness

1/1/1/1

HL 231

Drugs, Society and Human Behavior

3

Total Program Credits

35

Course Descriptions

First Semester Classes

LE 109

Police Report Writing

Credits:

3

Prerequisite:

Consent of instructor

A practical approach to the writing of police reports. Field notes, documentation of investigations, applications of various reports used by law enforcement. An emphasis will be placed on proper writing and spelling.

LE 205

Corrections

Credits:

3

This course covers an examination of the history and theory of correctional processes, plus current correctional practices in the administration of justice, parole, probation, prisons and other correctional institutions. Laws governing the sentencing process, parole and probation, and the conditional rights of prisoners are examined. Impact of case decisions on the administration of institutions will be discussed.

SO 103

Principles of Sociology

Credits:

3

The study of individuals and society and their impact upon each other. An overview of the principles, concepts, and methods of sociology. Focuses include socialization, social groups, social institutions, society, and culture.

EN 095

English Essentials

Credits:

3

Prerequisite:  Those scoring 36 or below on the placement exam, or consent of instructor.

This is a non-transferable, none-core course designed to prepare students for college level writing courses. This course emphasizes paragraph development and organization, sentence structure, word choice, transitions, punctuation, grammar, word economy, and level of usage.

OR

EN 101

Composition I

Credits:

3

Prerequisites: Successful completion of EN 095, a score of 37 or above on the placement exam, or consent of instructor

This course will include instruction in all the expository skills necessary to the writing of compositions. Students will be taught units of discourse designed to provide them with ideas and information suitable (a) to purpose, (b) to limitations of time, and (c) to audience. Some emphasis will be given to instruction in critical, persuasive, and evaluative skills in English composition. Students will be expected to demonstrate effective word choice, effective sentence structure, and the conventions of standard English grammar and usage.

CA 109

Integrated Software

Credits:

3

This course provides a hands-on approach to the most common applications of microcomputers including word processing, presentation software, electronic spreadsheet, and database management. An integrated software suite, that performs all the applications, is used by the student to complete projects in each area. Windows 95/NT applications and hardware are used throughout the course. Additionally, students are introduced to concepts regarding the ethical and social issues surrounding the use of this technology.

OR

CA 112

Word Processing

Credits:

3

Word Processing deals with all he steps that change an idea into a readable form of communication. IBM compatible computers and word processing software are provided for lab assignments. Features covered in this course include creating and editing, formatting, spell checking, fonts, search and replace, macros, and merging.

SD 101

Public Speaking

Credits:

3

This course is a performance course in public speaking. The student will apply the principles of oral public communication in speeches presented to the class. Emphasis will be placed on controlling fear while speaking extemporaneously in a clear, concise, and organized manner.

Second Semester Classes

LE 203

Criminal Evidence and Procedure

Credits:

3

A study of rules of evidence. Types of evidence, admissibility and preservation. Use of evidence in court and Montana procedures.

LE 245

Security Systems

Credits:

3

An analysis of security hardware and technology: locks, locked storage, electronic alarm devices and alarm systems.

LE 280

Defensive Tactics

Credits:

3

Prerequisite:

Consent of instructor

Courses not required in any curriculum, for which there is a particular need, or given on a trial basis to determine demand.

PY 103

General Psychology

Credits:

3

This is a general survey course to introduce students to the history and systems of psychology, the biology of the brain, perception and sensation, motivation, learning theory, maturation and development, personality theory, personality tests, and abnormal psychology, psychotherapy, and experimental psychology.

MA 095

Beginning Algebra

Credits:

3

The course is designed for students who will study it either as a preliminary to taking Intermediate Algebra and College Algebra or as a terminal work in Algebra which is intended as a prerequisite for elementary courses in various fields of education.

OR

MA 100

Intermediate Algebra

Credits:

3

Prerequisite:  Math Placement Test minimum score or consent of instructor

A continuation of the material presented in Beginning Algebra. The course reviews sets and real numbers, then presents a rigorous discussion of topics such as: polynomials, fractions, exponents and radicals, both first and second degree equations and inequalities, the Cartesian coordinate system, and relations and functions. Students with very poor math backgrounds should be encouraged to complete MA 095 before attempting MA 100.

SO 207

Criminology

Credits:

3

Prerequisite:

SO 103 or consent of instructor

An examination of the causes of crime and methods of dealing with the criminal. Criminal behavior and explanations of crime, types of crimes, and criminals.

OR

SO 225

Deviant Behavior

Credits:

3

Prerequisite:

SO 103 or consent of the instructor

A sociological examination of the deviance process utilizing a unified theoretical perspective including labeling, societal reaction, moral entrepreneurship, and the politics of deviance. The course may cover crime and delinquency, organized crime, drugs and alcoholism, mental illness and elite deviance, and other topics of interest.

HL 103

First Aid and CPR

Credits:

1

Red Cross course in emergency treatment and care of injuries. Certificates will be earned.

Recommended Elective Classes

HL 231

Drugs, Society and Human Behavior

Credits:

3

This course will study the physiology of drugs and psychological impact of drug abuse on the individual and society. Emphasis will be placed on the drugs of misuse and abuse. Their effects on ingestion, absorption, tolerance, withdrawal, and addiction will be discussed as well as short and long term effects on the central nervous system and other bodily systems.

LE 103

Administration of Justice

Credits:

3

A review of the total system of justice of the U.S. - Police, prosecution, defense, courts, and corrections. A review of the U.S. Constitution, federal and state laws as they affect the functional areas in the administration of criminal justice.

LE 106

Police Firearms Training

Credits:

2

Prerequisite:

Consent of instructor

This course covers familiarization with the handgun, state laws, and court decisions regarding the use of force and firearms safety. Lab work will consist of practical applications on a firearms range with participation in various firearms qualification courses. Students who participate must provide their own authorized firearms and ammo. (Firearms on campus must be stored according to College regulations.)

LE 110

Interviewing and Interrogations

Credits:

1

This is a course that will enable you to conduct interviews and interrogations with confidence. Successful interviews and interrogations require confidence combined with the skills obtained only through training, education, and experience. Human behavior is often predictable and helps to explain that "gut feeling" we experience when behavior is not consistent with what we have learned to expect. You will learn several methods of conducting interviews and interrogations.

LE 201

Criminal Law

Credits:

3

An analysis of the substantive criminal law along with its history and development. Knowledge of what constitutes specific criminal acts.

LE 209

Criminal Investigations

Credits:

3

Prerequisite:

Consent of instructor

The fundamental principles and concepts of investigation. A study of the methods of investigations and techniques used at the crime scene along with collection and preservation of evidence.

LE 225

Introduction to Security

Credits:

3

The historical and legal basis for private security and its role in modern society. A survey of administrative, personnel, and physical aspects of the security field with a special section on retail security (shoplifting, employee theft, etc.)

PE 106/206/

107/207

Conditioning and Fitness

Credits:

1/1/1/1

Fundamentals of physical fitness. Needs and interest of participants are emphasized through skilled or health related components.

PY 120

Stress Management

Credits:

2

This course provides the student with an overview of the causes and consequences of stress in everyday life. The emphasis of the course is on management of stress in everyday life as students will be encouraged to implement the course content on a personal level.

SO 209

Juvenile Delinquency

Credits:

3

Prerequisite:

SO 103 or consent of instructor

An introduction to theories of delinquency, causation and control. Role of the police, family, and community in delinquency.

Resource Personnel:

Chris Christensen

Organizational Development Officer, MDOC

Winnie Ore

Staff Development & Training Manager, MDOC

Gregg Noose

Administrator, Montana Law Enforcement Academy

Rae Glosser

Training Officer, Montana Law Enforcement Academy

Captain Jeffrey Walters

Dawson County Adult Correctional Facility

Richard Gray

Associate Dean, Helena College of Technology

John Dershem-Bruce

Correctional Officer, Dawson County Adult Correctional Facility